Sea Shepherd chases Jap vessels with bloody whales

An action-packed adventure awaits the Southern Seas. Sea Shepherd Australia’s mission to chase the Japanese whale hunters started with a bang. Re-blogging yesterday’s story:

Former Greens Senator and now Sea Shepherd Australia (SSA) chairman, Bob Brown, spoke in Hobart Monday to confirm the Sea Shepherd Fleet has located all five Japanese whale poaching vessels, including the Japanese factory ship, the Nisshin Maru, inside the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary (SOWS).

SSAThree SSA vessels – The Steve Irwin, The Bob Barker, and The Sam Simon – are now pursuing the Japanese whaling fleet. Their mission is to drive them away from the target poaching grounds, disrupt their hunt, prepare to shut down their whale-killing operations, and to ultimately send them back home.

The Steve Irwin’s helicopter first located the Nisshin Maru at 64°44′ S, 162°34′ W, in New Zealand’s sovereign waters in the Ross Dependency Antarctic region, and inside the internationally recognised SOWS.

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Sea Shepherd claims it has obtained footage and images of three dead protected minke whales on the deck of the Nisshin Maru, taken at the time the factory ship was first located. A fourth whale, believed to be a minke, was being butchered on the bloodstained deck.

SSA managing director, Jeff Hansen, said, the Southern Ocean has been tainted by illegal whaling activities. He said, “No one will ever know the pain and suffering these playful, gentle giants went through from the time the explosive harpoon ripped through their bodies to the time they drew their last breath in a red sea full of their own blood. ”

The group denounced the blood stains on the deck of the Japanese vessel and called it a barbaric act. Captain of The Steve Irwin, Sid Chakravarty, said, “When ‘science’ requires you to grotesquely bloat up the bodies of protected whales, stroll across a deck smeared with their blood, hauling their body parts with hooks and chains, and discarding their remains over the side, then that ‘science’ has no place in the 21st Century.

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“The Nisshin Maru is an out-and-out butcher ship and a floating butchery has no place in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary. Sea Shepherd will remain relentless in driving these fake, desperate and subverting ‘scientists’ back to Tokyo.”

Captain of The Bob Barker, Peter Hammarstedt, said,

Once again, the Japanese government has shown flagrant disregard for international law by continuing their illegal whale hunt while the world patiently awaits a decision from the International Court of Justice. The Japanese government’s dishonourable attempt the skirt the legal process is an insult to the cooperation demonstrated by people around the world, dedicated to enacting conservation laws out of a shared recognition for the need for environmental protection.

Blog Link: The Green Journal @ Asian Correspondent

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Whale hunters, pirates up for another Antarctic clash

The annual whale hunt season has arrived in the Southern Seas, which usually starts in December and lasts up to summer, around June. The “notorious Japanese whalers” embarked on their expedition early this month undeterred by the expected interception of the relentless anti-whaling group Sea Shepherd Australia (SSA). The whale activists launched the 10th Antarctic Defence Campaign (ADC), dubbed “Operation Relentless.”

This year expects more violent vessel clashes between the Japanese and the anti-whaling ”pirates”. SSA claims itself to be a defender of the Southern Ocean and all life forms it contains.

Last year, the 5000-ton My Bob Barker was severely damaged when the 8000-ton Nisshin Maru collided with it. The two groups clashed in exchanges that have seen stink bombs thrown at Japanese crew and water jets trained on protesters.

SSA’s “Operation Zero Tolerance” was able to limit the whalers’ haul to a record low of 103 Antarctic minke whales.

Foreign governments have criticised Japan’s whale hunts, alleging violation of the International Whaling Commission’s ban for commercial whaling which it introduced in 1986. Although Tokyo defended its whaling on grounds of scientific research, activists said “research whaling” is a cover up for commercial whaling that is banned under an international agreement. Tokyo also said the practice of eating whale is part of Japanese culinary tradition, and therefore the whales are studied as part of a bid by its whaling research institute to prove their populations can sustain commercial whaling.

NM-rams-BB-into-Sun-Laurel © Sea Shepherd/ Glenn Lockitch 2013
Japanese-owned Nisshin Maru rams the Bob Barker into the Sun Laurel. Pic: Glenn Lockitch.

Amid international outcry, two Japanese whaling ships and a surveillance vessel left on December 8 for the annual hunt in the Antarctic Sea. The three ships departed from the western port of Shimonoseki to join other ships to hunt up to 935 Antarctic minke whales and up to 50 fin whales through March, The Kyodo News reported.

The news agency said the Fisheries Agency had kept secret the departure date of the whaling fleet as a precaution against Sea Shepherd.

In Australia, three ships left Williamstown in Victoria and Hobart Port in Tasmania: The Steve Irwin ,The Sam Simon, and The Bob Barker departed to sail southward to confront the sea hunters. In the nine previous ADCs, SSA has saved over 4,500 protected whales from illegal slaughter.

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My Bob Barker docks at Docklands in Melbourne for public viewing. Pic: R. Yoon/The Green Journal.

Managing Director of SSA Jeff Hansen said the crew on the ships carry with them the hope, the aspirations, and the expectations of people from across the world who hope to see the end to the annual slaughter.

Captain of The Bob Barker Peter Hammarstedt of Sweden also stated the Japanese whale poaching fleet heading to the south is an offence to an international community waiting on the ruling of the International Court of Justice in The Hague. “Sea Shepherd will now, again, head south as the only authority acting to restore law and order to the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary,” the captain added.

Captain of The Steve Irwin, Siddarth Chakravarty of India expects that within a week, he and his crew will be with the whales and will not return until peace has been restored in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary.

This year, over 100 volunteers from 24 countries around the world join Operation Relentless to guard the gates of the southern sanctuary and to uphold the 1986 ban on commercial whaling.

Sea Shepherd Global Director,Alex Cornelissen of Netherlands said, “Like all poachers we encounter in our global campaigns, we will deal with the whalers the same way we always do: Relentlessly.”

Blog Link: The Green Journal at Asian Correspondent

Anti-whaling ship departs from Melbourne

A brief announcement from my mail box:

Melbourne based Sea Shepherd ships set to depart for Operation Relentless

Sea Shepherd ships, The Steve Irwin and The Sam Simon will depart Williamstown on Monday 16th December.

The crew of 100 from 24 nations are ready to confront the Japanese whale poachers and halt their planned illegal slaughter of more than a 1,000 whales. The proposed kill includes 935 protected Minke, 50 endangered Fin and 50 Humpback Whales.

We have invited all of our supporters to come down to see the ships and crew head off on this critical mission to defend the great whales of the Southern Ocean.

When: Monday 16th of December. Press Conference at 9am (The Sam Simon will depart at 5:30am and The Steve Irwin at 12pm).

Where: Sea Shepherd Australia Operations Base – Seaworks, 2 Ann Street, Williamstown, Victoria.

Who: Captain Siddharth Chakravarty, Captain Adam Meyerson and Sea Shepherd Australia Managing Director, Jeff Hansen. Others in attendance include Sea Shepherd crew and hundreds of local supporters

For background on Operation Relentless please see the new campaign website:

http://www.seashepherd.org.au/relentless/

(Photo: Sea Shepherd flagship, Steve Irwin)

(Photo: Sea Shepherd ship, My Steve Irwin)

Sea activists celebrate win against anti-whaling

Sea activists are celebrating the defeat, for now, of Japanese whale hunters who have ”left” the Southern Ocean.

Sea Shepherd Australia announced the success of Operation Zero Tolerance (OZT), a campaign to drive the Japanese whalers out of the seas near the Antarctic.

The conservation group welcomed the return of three ships commissioned to carry out the anti-whaling campaign. The ships, Steve Irwin, Sam Simon, and Bob Barker, with 110 international crew members, arrived at Seaworks Pier in Williamstown, Wednesday, amid a throng of anti-whaling fanatics.

The euphoric return is considered a victory for the whale conservation. Paul Watson, founder of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, earlier hailed his group’s success and said the Japanese had the lowest catch in history with “no more than 75″ of the mammals culled, the Japan Times reports.

The Japanese claims whaling is for scientific research purposes to justify the trade. Pic: News Ltd.

Watson, who is wanted by InterPol, calculates “the figure is a meagre total that contrasts with the 267 caught last year — 266 minke whales and one fin whale — and is dramatically below the Institute of Cetacean Research’s target this year of 935 minke whales and up to 50 fin whales.”

The three vessels embarked on the voyage in November last year to combat the Japanese whale killers. After four months, the OZT is considered as the most successful campaign so far in sending the Japanese back home.

A Japanese ship (right) collides with Bob Barker. Pic: AP.

The sea battle was fierce. Steve Irwin and Bob Barker collisions with Japanese vessels. In February this year, the 8,000 ton Nisshin Maru rammed into the Steve Irwin and the Bob Barker. Watson “accused Japanese coastguard personnel of throwing concussion grenades at their protest ships during a confrontation in the frigid waters near Antarctica and said the Bob Barker was taking on water in its engine room.”

Bob Brown, a co-chair of the OZT was alerted during the confrontation and had called on Australian government to dispatch a naval ship to the area to ease the tensions.

“It is illegal to be ramming ships in any seas anywhere on the planet. It is illegal for a tanker to be carrying heavy fuel oil into Antarctic waters under international law,” Brown said.

Three ships and 110 crews arrived in Williamstown, VIC, but not Captain Paul Watson. Pic: Sea Shepherd Australia.

Jeff Hansen, Director Sea Shepherd Australia, however, acknowledged with “heavy heart” that Captain Paul Watson has not arrived ashore.

Watson has disappeared after skipping bail in Germany amid allegations by the Costa Rican government that he endangered the lives of shark finners back in 2002. Watson strongly denied the allegation. He also faced extradition requests from both Costa Rica and Japan against whom Sea Shepherd have waged a long and bitter war over whales in the Antarctic.

A whale being hauled by a large Japanese vessel. Pic: Australian Custom Service.

While sea activists are celebrating, the Japanese Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Minister Yoshimasa Hayashi earlier said that whaling has been part of a long historical tradition in Japan.

Sea Sheperd may have won the battle, but the war is not over.

Blog Link: Asian Correspondent